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  • Sly & The Family Stone 'Stand!' Named To National Recording Registry

    Sly & The Family Stone’s 1969 album, Stand!, is among 25 recordings selected this year to be inducted into the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry.

    Under the terms of the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, the Librarian of Congress each year selects 25 recordings that are “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant” and at least 10 years old.

    Stand! (album) — Sly & The Family Stone (1969)
    This 1969 album had twin objectives — to urge people to get along despite cultural differences and to encourage people to get out of their chairs and move. The album was propelled by an impossibly smooth horn section, a funky organ and dangerous maneuverings of the guitar and bass. Its key selections — “Sing a Simple Song,” “I Want to Take You Higher,” “Stand!” and “Everyday People” — are instantly recognizable and serve as foundational statements in the music of the late 1960s and as precursors of the ’70s’ soul and funk. Before forming the group in 1967, leader and vocalist Sly Stone had been a fixture of the San Francisco music scene, playing in several bands, deejaying for radio stations KSOL and KDIA and successfully producing Bobby Freeman, The Beau Brummels and The Mojo Men. Having produced the multiracial band’s previous three albums, Stone was amply qualified for this, the group’s fourth studio effort. The resulting record remains one of the most heavily sampled records of all time and was the undisputed high point of this band’s recording legacy.

    Read more at The Hollywood Reporter.

  • At a recent tribute concert in Oakland, Mayor Libby Schaaf officially declared January 24, 2015 as Sly & The Family Stone Day, citing the local band’s positive message. Original band members were on hand to accept the award. Watch the proclamation (presented by Undercover concert promoter Lyz Luke and KPFA's Rickey Vincent), courtesy of KQED Arts.

  • 'I'm Just Like You: Sly's Stone Flower 1969-70' Available Now

    In 1970, The Family Stone were at the peak of their popularity, but the maestro Sly Stone had already moved his head to a completely different space. The first evidence of Sly’s musical about-turn was revealed by the small catalog of his new label, Stone Flower: a pioneering, peculiar, minimal electro-funk sound that unfolded over just four seven-inch singles. Stone Flower’s releases were credited to their individual artists, but each had Sly’s design and musicianship stamped into the grooves–and the words “Written by Sylvester Stewart/Produced and arranged by Sly Stone” on the sticker.

    Set up by Stone’s manager David Kapralik with distribution by Atlantic Records, Stone Flower was, predictably, a family affair: the first release was by Little Sister, fronted by Stone’s little sister Vaetta Stewart. It was short lived too–the imprint folded in 1971–but its influence was longer lasting. The sound Stone formulated while working on Stone Flower’s output would shape the next phase in his own career as a recording artist: it was here he began experimenting with the brand new Maestro Rhythm King drum machine. In conjunction with languid, effected organ and guitar sounds and a distinctly lo-fi soundscape, Sly’s productions for Stone Flower would inform the basis of his masterwork There’s A Riot Goin’ On.

    The first 45 came in February 1970: Little Sister’s dancefloor-ready “You’re The One” hit Number 22 in the charts–the label’s highest showing. The follow-up, “Stanga," also by Little Sister, made the wah pedal the star. The third release came from 6IX, a six-piece multi-racial rock group whose sole release, a super-slow version of The Family Stone’s “Dynamite," featured only the lead singer and harmonica player from the group. Joe Hicks was the final Stone Flower stablemate; his pulsing, electronic "Life And Death In G&A” is one of the bleakest moments Sly Stone ever created on disc (Hicks’ prior single for Scepter, “Home Sweet Home,” the first released Stone Flower production, is also included).

    This compilation of Sly’s Stone Flower era gathers each side of the five 45s plus ten previously unissued cuts from the label archives, all newly remastered from the original tapes. In these grooves you’ll find the missing link between the rocky, soulful Sly Stone of Stand! and the dark, drum machine-punctuated, overdubbed sound of There’s A Riot Going On. I’m Just Like You: Sly’s Stone Flower 1969-70 opens up the mysteries of an obscure but monumental phase in Stone’s career.

    I'm Just Like You: Sly's Stone Flower 1969-1970:

    1. Little Sister - You're the One (Parts 1 & 2)
    2. Sly Stone - Just Like a Baby
    3. Joe Hicks - Home Sweet Home (Part 2)
    4. 6IX - I'm Just Like You
    5. Little Sister - Somebody's Watching You (Full Band Version)
    6. Joe Hicks - Life & Death in G & A
    7. 6IX - Trying to Make You Feel Good
    8. Little Sister - Stanga
    9. 6IX - Dynamite
    10. Little Sister - You're the One (Early Version)
    11. Sly Stone - Africa
    12. Joe Hicks - I'm Goin' Home (Part 1)
    13. Little Sister - Somebody's Watching You
    14. 6IX - You Can, We Can
    15. Sly Stone - Spirit
    16. 6IX - I'm Just Like You (Full Band Version)
    17. Sly Stone - Scared
    18. 6IX - Dynamite (Alternate Version)

    Rolling Stone review: 3 1/2 stars

  • Sly & The Family Stone 'If You Want Me To Stay' Featured In 'Tammy' Movie

    Sly & The Family Stone's "If You Want Me To Stay" is one of the songs featured in the new movie, Tammy, starring Melissa McCarthy in theaters now. Can't wait to hear it in the movie? Get the song now at iTunes!

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